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Global Opportunity Scholarship

An important part of a BYU education involves academic experiences around the world. Students gain experience in a truly global classroom through BYU international programs, including internships, study abroad, field school, and direct enrollment. The Global Opportunity Scholarship was crafted with Provo Parity in mind—that is, the idea that with this scholarship, an academic program abroad shouldn’t cost more than a semester on campus. The purpose of the scholarship is to provide just enough funding assistance and an opportunity for students who, after doing all they can do for themselves, need a little more help to have an educational experience abroad. We call it the “scholarship of last resort.” Financial situations vary, of course, but with your preparation, some sacrifice, and a deep commitment toward having an international education experience—this scholarship can make the difference for students like you.

Eligibility Requirements

In order to qualify for this scholarship, you must be a BYU student from any major, (including international and married students), who is participating in a BYU international program through the Kennedy Center, and who has no previous international academic experience.

Application Process

STEP ONE: Students interested in being nominated for this scholarship must download, print, and complete the student section of this form.

STEP TWO: They must set up a time to meet with the faculty director of their international study program. They will manually hand in both pages of the form to their director who will then ask them questions regarding the student portion of the form.

STEP THREE: Faculty program directors will then nominate ONE student from their program for the scholarship.

STEP FOUR: Nominated students are contacted directly by the Kennedy Center to complete an online application. This application includes basic personal information, a personal statement, other funding sources sought, and a detailed program budget.

STEP FIVE: Students are then called for an in-person interview to discuss their application. Once all interviews have been conducted, the scholarship committee convenes and discusses individual applications.

STEP SIX: All applicants are then notified whether or not they received the scholarship.

Deadlines

Winter 2023

Monday, 8 August—Nominations open to faculty program directors
Friday, 14 October—Last day for faculty program directors to nominate a student
Friday, 28 October—Final decision and announcements to students and faculty
Thursday, 10 November—Mandatory scholarship orientation meeting
Monday, 28 November—Scholarship deposited into student account (once survey completed)

Spring 2023

Monday, 5 December—Nominations open to faculty program directors
Friday, 20 January—Last day for faculty program directors to nominate a student
Friday, 17 February—Final decision and announcements to students and faculty
Thursday, 2 March—Mandatory scholarship orientation meeting
Thursday, 23 March—Scholarship deposited into student account (once survey completed)

Summer 2023

Monday, 5 December—Nominations open to faculty program directors
Friday, 3 March—Last day for faculty program directors to nominate a student
Friday, 7 April—Final decision and announcements to students and faculty
Thursday, 13 April—Mandatory scholarship orientation meeting
Friday, 28 April—Scholarship deposited into student account (once survey completed)

Fall 2023

Monday, 19 June—Nominations open to faculty program directors
Friday, 7 July—Last day for faculty program directors to nominate a student
Friday, 21 July—Final decision and announcements to students and faculty
Friday, 4 August—Mandatory scholarship orientation meeting
Friday, 11 August—Scholarship deposited into student account (once survey completed)

Testimonials

Watch Sydney's Story

“I really wanted to go on a study abroad to Ecuador. I’m barely making ends meet with tuition and rent and everything. I’ve worked as many as four jobs during a semester and have had to cancel two previous study abroad applications because of a lack of funds; the gap between paying for school and a study abroad was just too wide. However, on my third attempt, which was going down a similar path, everything changed with the news I had received a Global Opportunity Scholarship.

Sydney Jensen, Linguistics

Sydney’s experience may be similar to that of many BYU students who find themselves with a desire to enrich their education through experiential international learning opportunities but can’t take advantage of the prospect because of a lack of funds.

Here's what a few of our other Global Opportunity Scholarship recipients said after completing their programs:

“I remember walking between government offices in downtown Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, with Professor Ty Turley and talking to him about graduate school options. Minutes later we were trying to set up an appointment with the top official in the Ministry of Health, and I found myself thinking this was the epitome of development work with a political science emphasis. There I was working with a government official to create better policy in a country beset by poverty. I was a world away from Provo and my classes, but I realized my academic training had prepared me for this real-world experience. That experience in turn is preparing me for the research I want to do and the future career I would like as an international development program evaluator.”

James Hodgson, Political Science, Impact Evidence Field Study, Tanzania

“One of the most meaningful cultural experiences I had in the Czech Republic was in a clinical setting. I did not speak Czech and most of the patients did not speak English. . . . It changed the way I will forever practice nursing.”

Ashlyn Moore, Nursing, Czech Republic Internship

“This experience was life-changing and even more impactful for me because my heritage is Samoan. There are many things I learned about the differences in health care and how people receive needed treatment. Opportunities for preventative care is so much cheaper but not available for much of the world. Once while assisting a cardiologist from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota we were screening children for rheumatic heart disease when we examined a five-year-old girl who had a severe case of rheumatic heart disease. This little girl needed surgery. I had consulted with and translate for Dr. Nkomo and helped explain to the family what this doctor would do to save their daughter’s life.

“As we worked together, Dr. Nkomo and I became close friends. Before we left Samoa he invited me to come and job shadow him at the Mayo Clinic—and so, in August, after getting back to the U.S. I traveled to Minnesota to shadow a surgeon at a world-class hospital.

This remarkable experience occurred just as I’m starting the process to prepare and apply to medical schools across the nation. None of these opportunities would have happened for me if I had stayed in Provo.”

Taylor Avei, Biology, Samoa Rheumatic Relief Program