Reference Book Errors and Comments

 

Title: Merit Students Encyclopedia
Publisher: P. F. Colliers, Inc
ISBN Number:
Book Year: 1990
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

90

 

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

12,000

Portrayal: 9

Total: 29

Works Cited: 11

 

Care of facts: 9

Maps: 5

 

 

Up-to-date: 7

Pict./Illust.: 20

 

 

Romanization: 8

Chart/Graph: 4

 

POINTS: 40

33

12.1

5

 

Factual Errors or Inconsistencies

Page

Errors

Correction

405 (v1)

• Hankul (Han'gul) has 14 consonants and 11 vowels.

• Han'gul has 14 consonants and 10 vowels.

440 (v10)

• South Korean currency: 1 won = 100 hwan

• About 13% of the South Korean population is Christian.

• Hwan is the old currency unit. Korean replace hwan with won in the '60's
• More than 20% of South Korean population is Christian.

441 (v10)

Very outdated information
• Although great numbers of Koreans moved to the cities in the 1960's and 1970's, the majority still live in rural areas.
• Korean farm houses generally have earthen floors and walls, and thatched roofs.
• Barley, millet, and corn are eaten when rice is scarce.


• Western dress is popular in the cities, but many Koreans wear their traditional garments.

• The majority of Koreans live in big cities.


• Most Korean farm houses are modernized.
• Korea has enough rice to satisfy any public demand. The other grains listed are eaten when preferred, rather than out of necessity.
• Traditional Korean dress is seldom worn even in rural areas

443 (v10)

Men are subject to military training when they reach the age of 20.

Actually one can volunteer at age 18, but most elect to go in their early twenties; deferments are available for education, etc.

416 (v12)

South Korean currency: 1 won = 100 hwan

Hwan is the old currency unit. Korean switch to a system using won instead of hwan in the '60's.

 

Maps

Page

Topic

405 (v1)

Distribution of the major alphabets in use throughout the world -- Korea cited

300 (v2)

Asia in 1939

440 (v10)

Small map of North and South Korea in relation to all of Asia

444 (v10)

One page map of North and South Korea with major cities and railroads highlighted

448 (v10)

Korean War map, with dates and troop movements cited

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

242 (v2)

Uniforms of the U.S. Army -- Korean War Infantry Private represented

VI (v7)

Flags of the world

441 (v10)

• A valley in the southeastern part of South Korea
• The gold Buddha at Kongju, dating from 8th century A.D.

442 (v10)

A field of rice in front of a traditional thatched-roof house

443 (v10)

• A traditional meal of several small dishes
• South Korean workers in a telecommunications factory

446 (v10)

North Korean civilians parade during a military celebration in Pyongyang (P'yöngyang), the capital of North Korea

449 (v10)

Refugees crowd aboard all available boats in Hungnam, as they flee the Chinese advance in December 1950

450 (v10)

• U.S. Marine storming ashore at Inchon (Inch'ön).
• A U.S. jet plane bombing an enemy installation

451 (v10)

U.S. tank using a flamethrower against a Chinese pillbox during the spring counterattack of 1951

452 (v10)

• South Korean civilians wait for transportation away from a battle raging nearby
• U.S. troops fighting their way into Seoul, September 1950

453 (v10)

• A Chinese prisoner is interrogated by General Almond
• Chinese prisoners, in winter army uniforms of quilted cotton
• North Korean soldiers, captured in the fighting along the Naktong

454 (v10)

U.S. General William Harrison and North Korean Commander Nam Il sign armistice documents at Panmunjom (P'anmunjöm), July 27, 1953

345 (v11)

President Truman meets General Douglas MacArthur on Wake Island in October, 1950

III (v18)

Illustration of a North Korean colonel, 1955

 

Charts or Graphs

Page

Topic

277 (v2)

Political divisions of Asia: South Korea and North Korea cited

440 (v10)

Brief "General Facts" table on North and South Korea at the beginning of the "Korea" section in the encyclopedia

445 (v10)

Korea map index, complementary to the map found on page 444

416 (v12)

World currencies: North and South Korea represented

 

Comments

The information about the Korean War is detailed, well explained, and there are many pictures.

 

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Title: The New Book of Knowledge
Publisher: Grolier Incorporated
ISBN Number: 0-7172-0525-8
Book Year: 1994
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

71

 

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

6,300

Portrayal: 9

Total: 36

Works Cited: 0

 

Care of facts: 9

Maps: 4

 

 

Up-to-date: 9

Pict./Illust.: 28

 

 

Romanization: 8

Chart/Graph: 4

 

POINTS: 21

35

15

0

 

Factual Errors or Inconsistencies

Page

Errors

Correction

295 (v10)

• Typical Korean food: kukso
• In the South, most of the new buildings may have small coal stoves for heating, but they will usually have one room that is still kept warm in the old way, using a heated floor.
• Korean left their shoes outside on the ground or on a narrow wooden porch called a maru.

• It is called kuksu.
• South Koreans still use Ondol heating system for the floors of the house (for all rooms, not just one). And they usually use electricity and gas for heating, not coal.
• Koreans left their shoes on the ground or a step, but not on a maru.

297 (v10)

• Monetary unit of South Korea is won. 1 won equals 10 whan or 100 chun.

•Average temperature of Seoul in winter is 0C, and in summer is 27C.

• Korea used unit whan or chun until 1960's. They do not use the word whan or chun.
• Average temperature of Seoul in winter is -3C, and in summer is 25C.

299 (v10)

Kim Hongdo (1745-1814(?)

According to a Korean dictionary, he was born in 1760.

121 (v17)

Seoul was founded in 1392.

Seoul became the capital of Chosön in 1394.

 

Maps

Page

Topic

295 (v10)

North and South Korea in relation to China, the USSR, and Japan, with major cities and rivers highlighted

303 (v10)

The Korean War, with troop movements and dates cited

550 (v15)

Korea (showing the location of Pusan)

121 (v17)

Korea (showing the location of Seoul)

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

232 (v6)

Flags of Asia

294 (v10)

• Flags of North and South Korea
• Female North Korean factory worker holding a bouquet of flowers
• South Korean boy in Little league uniform
• A girl in a traditional Korean dress
• A village elder

296 (v10)

The Sobaek (Söbaek) mountain range in southwest Korea

298 (v10)

• Transplanting rice in the south
• Production and manufacturing of Hyundai automobiles at a factory

299 (v10)

• Seoul, the capital and largest city of South Korea, is one of the world's fastest growing cities
• Pyongyang (P'yöngyang) is North Korea's capital and largest city
• Gold and jade crown from the Silla kingdom (A.D. 400)

300 (v10)

• Celadon vase, inlaid with peony and chrysanthemum designs, from the mid 1100's
• The painting "A Dancing Boy," by Kim Hong-Do, a scholar-painter of the Yi kings

301 (v10)

• A statue of Kim Il Sung, President of North Korea
• Korean refugees flee southward at the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950
• Kim Young Sam was elected President of South Korea in 1992

302 (v10)

General Douglas MacArthur, planner of the Inchon (Inch'ön) landing during the Korean War

303 (v10)

Weary U.S. Marines rest briefly during the long retreat from North Korea

304 (v10)

• Soldiers digging into a hillside during a battle of the Korean War
• North Korean and United Nations peace negotiators debating at Panmunjom (P'anmunjöm)

230 (v14)

Korean students playing kaya-ko, a traditional instrument

550 (v15)

Pusan is the second largest city and the chief seaport of South Korea

121 (v17)

Seoul, capital of South Korea

111 (v19)

Army uniforms throughout American history -- Korean War (1950-53) represented

114 (v19)

Air Force uniforms throughout American history -- Korean War (1950-53) represented

123 (v19)

Marine uniform throughout American history -- Korean War (1950-53) represented

566 (v12)

Drawing of the dog belonging to Gamag Nara's (Kkamang Nara) King as it tries to hold the sun: astronomical myth explaining the traditional Korean story of why an eclipse occurs

 

Charts or Graphs

Page

Topic

296 (v10)

Facts and figures (North Korea)

297 (10)

Facts and figures (South Korea)

123 (v19)

Important dates in U.S. Marine Corps history -- 1950-53 "Marines engage in United Nations action in Korea."

67 (v4)

Decorations and medals of the world: Korean Service Medal (United Nations)

 

Comments

This encyclopedia has just one section for North and South Korea together. Because of the many differences between the two countries, there needs to be two different sections, one for each country. For example, this edition explains the heating system of Korea as "using coal stoves," which might apply to North Koreans but not to that many South Koreans. It also says that one of the main religions of Korea is Ch'öndogyo. Ch'öndogyo is always listed as a religion in North Korea, but there are only 50,000 believers of this religion in South Korea. Having two sections would more clearly show the distinct uniqueness of each half of the peninsula.

From 1991 to 1993, the contents of each volume were almost the same, but the 1994 edition had been updated and some mistakes were corrected.

  

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Title: Lands and Peoples
Publisher: Grolier Inc.
ISBN Number: 0-7172-8013-6
Book Year: 1993
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

55

 

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

5,000

Portrayal: 9

Total: 9

Works Cited: 0

 

Care of facts: 9

Maps: 2

 

 

Up-to-date: 8

Pict./Illust.: 5

 

 

Romanization: 8

Chart/Graph: 2

 

POINTS: 16.7

34

3.8

0

 

Factual Errors or Inconsistencies

Page

Errors

Correction

372

Korean farmers often plow with water buffalo.

There are no water buffalo in Korea. They have used oxen, but today most South Korean farmers use machinery for farming.

435

Major religions of S. Korea: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, and Chondogyo (Ch'öndogyo)

Shamanism should be included as well.

437

• Because the universities have room for only a tenth of the student population, competition for admission is fierce.
• Two of every five South Koreans live in farm households.
• Despite heavy use of fertilizers and high yielding seeds, rising demand and a series of poor harvests have made South Korea a net importer of rice since 1977.

• About 30% of high school graduates can go to college.

• Only about 10% of the population live in farm households.
• Rice production has risen and improved each year since the Korean War, reaching self-sufficiency at about the time this article implies they began to have insufficient harvests. Since 1977 there have been few years that they needed to import rice; in many years they have exported a surplus.

 

Maps

Page

Topic

430

North Korea, with major cities and rivers highlighted, in relation to China, the USSR, and South Korea

435

South Korea, with major cities and rivers highlighted, in relation to China, the USSR, and North Korea

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

429

• Skyscrapers line the streets of Pyongyang (P'yöngyang), the capital and largest city of North Korea.
• North Korean flag

432

The birthday of Kim Il Sung, President of North Korea, is celebrated with great fanfare.

434

• Seoul, the South Korean capital, ranks among the world's largest cities.
• South Korean flag

436

The circle dance, performed in traditional costume, is one of many folk customs still practiced.

  

Charts or Graphs

Page

Topic

430

Facts and figures on North Korea

435

Facts and figures on South Korea

 

Comments

Overall, the text was well written. There were a few "up-to-date" errors, but the accuracy score was fairly high. Points were lost for having few words and a low number of visuals.

 

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Reference Book Errors and Comments

 

Title: Children's Britannica
Publisher: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc.
ISBN Number: 0-85229-226-0
Book Year: 1991
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

46

 

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

3,000

Portrayal: 9

Total: 10

Works Cited: 0

 

Care of facts: 7

Maps: 1

 

 

Up-to-date: 8

Pict./Illust.: 6

 

 

Romanization: 7

Chart/Graph: 3

 

POINTS: 10.7

31

4.2

0

 

Factual Errors or Inconsistencies

Page

Errors

Correction

236 (v10)

North Korea is separated from South at the 38th parallel.

North Korea is separated from South at the Military Demarcation Line.

237 (v10)

• South Korea is separated from North at the 38th parallel.
• About 85% of South Korea is mountainous.
• North Korean government: Republic

• South Korea is separated from North at the Military Demarcation Line.
• About 70% of South Korea is mountainous.
• North Korean government: communist

144 (v13)

Chinese characters: kanji

Chinese characters: kanji (in Japanese), hancha (In Korean).

144 (v13)

During the 15th century, a local phonetic script called en-mun (today known as hangul) was invented.

En-mun should be spelled ön-mun.

 

Maps

Page

Topic

237 (v10)

North and South Korea in relation to China, Japan, and the USSR

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

36 (v7)

Korean-American children at school in Los Angeles.

236 (v10)

North Korean children march past a statue of the President of their country, Kim Il-Sung.

238 (v10)

A Korean family , hanging up a supply of noodles to dry.

239 (v10)

Seoul, the capital of South Korea.

316 (v15)

The reconstructed South Gate of the old city, Seoul, South Korea.

146 (v18)

Members of first Marine brigade to reach Korea advance during the defense of the Pusan perimeter.

111 (v10)

A Korean farm worker uses a hand tractor in a rice field.

 

Graphs or Charts

Page

Topic

146 (v13)

Some leading oriental writers and works of literature -- 16 Korean writers listed

237 (v10)

Facts About North Korea -- general information

240 (v10)

Facts About South Korea -- general information

 

Comments

In contrast to the Encyclopedia Britannica, there were several "care of facts" errors in this text. This is interesting to note since the publisher is the same. The Romanization throughout the text was not standard. A low number of words and visuals also contributed in bringing the total points down.

 

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Title: The New Grolier Student Encyclopedia
Publisher: Grolier Educational Corporation
ISBN Number: 0-7172-7137-4
Book Year: 1991
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

39

 

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

1,500

Portrayal: 6

Total: 11

Works Cited: 0

 

Care of facts: 8

Maps: 2

 

 

Up-to-date: 7

Pict./Illust.: 5

 

 

Romanization: 8

Chart/Graph: 4

 

POINTS: 5

29

4.6

0

 

Factual Errors or Inconsistencies

Page

Errors

Correction

1376

• North Korea: People's Democratic Republic of Korea
• About 40% of all Koreans earn their living by farming.

• North Korea: Democratic People's Republic of Korea => DPRK
• Should be about 10-20%.

1300

• Population of South Korea: 45 million
• Many Korean houses have paper windows instead of glass

• Population of South Korea: 43 million
• Paper used to be used for doors and windows, but now, most Korean houses have glass.

 

Maps

Page

Topic

1376

North Korea highlighted in relation to China, the USSR, Japan , and South Korea

1377

South Korea highlighted in relation to China, the USSR, Japan, and North Korea

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

1473

General Douglas MacArthur

1377

Pusan, South Korea's second largest city and a busy seaport

1378

• U.S. troops await an attack during the Korean War
• A helicopter is used to fly a wounded U.S. soldier away from the battlefield during the Korean War

2471

U.S. soldiers in South Korea cope with severe winter weather as well as the enemy during the Korean War.

 

Charts or Graphs

Page

Topic

1376

North Korean flag and general country information

1377

South Korean flag and general country information

2541

Major wars fought since 476 A.D. -- Korean war cited 1950-53

2541

Caption quoting U.S. casualties in the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War

 

Comments

The reviewers felt that the portrayal was not consistent with the advances that have been made in Korea during the past several years. The text also did not seem to be up-to-date or current in the information given.

The total number of words was very low. The number of errors to words ratio was disappointing.

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Title: Childcraft -- The how and why library (Volume 9)
Publisher: World Book, Inc.
ISBN Number: 0 -7166 - 0191 - 5
Book Year: 1991
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

*

* This work gives only minimal information and makes no attempt to comprehensively discuss Korea. Assigning points for this work would be meaningless.

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

400

Portrayal:

Total: 2

Works Cited: none

 

Care of facts:

Maps: 0

 

 

Up-to-date:

Pict./Illust.: 2

 

 

Romanization:

Chart/Graph: 0

 

POINTS:

 

 

 

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

Not written

Korean-Americans perform a farmer's dance during the Ch'usok (Ch'usök) festival in New York City.

Not written

Public telephone in Seoul.

 

Comments

The text has one section about the autumn festival of Ch'usök in Korea. Also, there is one section telling an old story of a Korean general who won a battle using a kite to frighten the enemy.

 

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Title: Oxford Children's Encyclopedia
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN Number: 0 19 910 139 6
Book Year: 199
Reviewer: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

*

* This work gives only minimal information and makes no attempt to comprehensively discuss Korea. Assigning points for this work would be meaningless.

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

300

Portrayal:

Total: 6

Works Cited: none

 

Care of facts:

Maps: 1

 

 

Up-to-date:

Pict./Illust.: 3

 

 

Romanization:

Chart/Graph: 2

 

POINTS:

 

 

 

 

Maps

Page

Topic

160

North and South Korea with several cities, main roads, and railways highlighted.

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

76

Opening ceremonies at the Seoul Olympics in South Korea in 1988.

160

• North Korean schoolgirls cross in front of huge statues of athletes and a mural showing victorious athletes.
• Open market for clothing along a street in Seoul, the capital of South Korea.

 

Charts or Graphs

Page

Topic

160

North Korea: small, general information section

160

South Korea: small, general information section

 

Comments

The text contains a very brief country profile on Korea, containing four paragraphs. The portrayal though general is complementary to Korea.

 

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Title: The Kingfisher Children's Encyclopedia
Publisher: Kingfisher Books, Grisewood & Dempsey Inc.
ISBN Number: 1 - 85697 - 800 - 1
Book Year: 1992
Reviewers: Hae Kyoung Kim, Scott Moncrief

 

TOTAL POINTS

*

* This work gives only minimal information and makes no attempt to comprehensively discuss Korea. Assigning points for this work would be meaningless.

Word Count (40)

Accuracy (40)

Visuals (15)

Bibliography (5)

100

Portrayal:

Total: 7

Works Cited: none

 

Care of facts:

Maps: 2

 

 

Up-to-date:

Pict./Illust.: 3

 

 

Romanization:

Chart/Graph: 2

 

POINTS:

 

 

 

 

Maps

Page

Topic

390

• North Korea between China and Japan.
• South Korea between China and Japan.

 

Pictures or Illustrations

Page

Topic

390

• North Korean flag
• South Korean flag
• Olympic stadium in Seoul.

 

Charts and Graphs

Page

Topic

390

• North Korea: Six general information categories
• South Korea: Six general information categories

 

Comments

The text contains one section for both North and South Korea and is very brief, using only three short paragraphs. The maps are general, but a good reference for the age group reading this level of text.

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